Jump to content

Welcome to WatercoolingUK Community Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account
Photo

Some basic help to understand OCing needed


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1
DanielCoffey

DanielCoffey

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 49 posts
I need some help with some of the very basics concepts of overclocking. Not the How... (because there are guides already for that) but more the When... and Why... questions.
 
For info I will be using a 4770K water cooled on an Asus Maximus VI Formula board with a 780 Ti. Typical usage will be household tasks with some gaming at 1440p.
 
When OCing the CPU, is just the Boost speed raised or is it the idle floor raised too? What do the typical OC settings do when the machine is idling? With the ASUS ROG boards is it easy to turn the OC on and off on demand or do you just leave it on all the time?
 
Does OCing the GPU work in the same way? Will the GPU be idling faster too or is it again just the boost values that are raised?
 
I have read that some folks undervolt to save power and heat when the machine is idle. If this is a good idea for typical household use, can you switch between profiles on a ROG board easily depending on need?


#2
Gilj

Gilj

    Level 2

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 105 posts

modern cpu's and gpu's have power saving built in so when they are idle they automatically under volt and under clock.

 

modern over clocking techniques often involve raising the 'turbo' speed of CPU's and graphics cards but with CPU's at least it is optional whether you choose to go for a turbo overclock or a standard overclock.

 

diehard enthusiasts wanting to get the highest clock speed for benchmarks will often disable the power saving features of the processor but for an average user you should definitely leave these enabled to save on your electricity bill and go for a modest overclock either turbo or classic.



#3
IanF

IanF

    Level 10

  • Moderators
  • 2,896 posts

I have my i7 950 overclocked to 4GHz (from 3.06 at 1.3v) with the power saving (Intel speedstep) enabled so that the clock multiplier and voltage are dropped for light to moderate use. This give me the speed when needed and the power saving when i don't :)

 

If I wanted to run a higher clock then i would have to disable the speedstep as the OC is unstable past 4GHz with it on.

 

The OC is really noticeable when doing CPU intensive task, most commonly for me is encoding DVD to AVI. It also helps in games, especially those that don't use all the cpu cores. 

 

Overclcking the GPU is usually easier as there are Windows utilities that let you set the clocks and voltages such as EVGA Precision or MSI Afterburner. I personally use Nvidia Inspector.

 

I've never noticed much benefit in games, but it makes quite a difference when I run Folding@home GPU client.

 

Ian


ian.jpg


#4
DanielCoffey

DanielCoffey

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 49 posts

I think I will be keeping the Speedstep enabled then since I don't need extreme overclocks.

 

I will be aiming for my 4770K to be running somewhere near 4.4GHz unless I am unlucky with the chip I have got. It is good to know it will fall back to the power save mode when not gaming however. Skyrim only uses a couple of cores so it should stay in the boost state for longer, especially with the extra radiator cooling I have.

 

 

It sounds like I can mostly ignore the ROG OC profile tools then if I will be leaving the power saving on the CPU.



#5
deadfire19

deadfire19

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 6 posts

You can use the Asus Automatic over clocking tool and work your way down on the voltage until it's unstable. That's how I got 4.6GHz at 1.21V on my 3570K.



#6
DanielCoffey

DanielCoffey

    Level 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 49 posts

Thanks - I had managed to follow some of the more technical guides and I have my 4770K 4.5GHz stable at 1.25V at the moment. Load temps are in the mid-40s too so I can push it higher if I need to.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users